The structure of Buddhism

my Buddhist structure chart

George Box: “All models are wrong. Some are useful.”

Culturally, I have the impression we’re leaving post-modernism behind and that it hasn’t worked. Anecdotally I hear expressions of confusion and lostness. It’s like we’ve come adrift from the past; we’re floating around in a sea of debris trying to make sense of it all. We’re confronted with multiple mashups without reliable tools for discerning which to engage with and which to discard. Approaching Buddhism, mindfulness and meditation can be like this. How do we know what will work and what won’t?

Continue reading “The structure of Buddhism”

The limited​ language of the no-self

Why do you meditate?

Why do you meditate?

Photo by Meenakshi Madhavan

Here I take a critical look at the language used to describe meditation, particularly Buddhist meditation.

We’re stuck in a limited pattern of meditation-speak, one that centers around ideas of the self. Much meditation and the discourse surrounding it is tied up in the revelatory discovery that we don’t have a self.  There’s such a strong emphasis on this that it risks occluding other purposes; it narrows the results of meditation practice to a restricted, prescribed understanding: that of ‘no-self’.

Continue reading “The limited​ language of the no-self”

Is Vajrayana hacking the West?

Come back when you finish preliminaries
“Come back when you finish preliminaries”

In my last post, I categorised justifications for the idea that Westerners are ill-suited to practice Vajrayana. Those justifications – that our values are incompatible, we can’t commit, our lifestyles do not provide conducive circumstances or that our karmic connection is lacking – are anecdotally common. Sometimes they are not stated outright but hidden in conciliatory language. My versions of these justifications are stripped down: I wanted to expose them in their most simple form, to make them easier to spot in articles and conversations.

In this post I highlight some generalisations underlying such justifications, then I examine the notion that Western culture is to blame.

Continue reading “Is Vajrayana hacking the West?”

“Westerners can’t hack Vajrayana”

Some Western Vajrayana practitioners have told me they think Vajrayana is too difficult for Westerners. Is this a Buddhist Paradox?

It's complicated
It’s complicated

The idea that Westerners can’t hack Vajrayana is common in Tibetan Buddhist circles. Some previous commenters expressed this view eloquently and made good points. This post is partly in response to them.

Related questions are:

  • Is Vajrayana necessarily harder than other Buddhisms?
  • Is Vajrayana a worse fit than other Buddhisms for people living in contemporary Westernized cultures?

I won’t address those questions in this post. Here, I categorize the reasons I’ve heard justifying the view that Westerners can’t hack Vajrayana. In later posts, I’ll explain why I think they are only partially true, or mistaken.

This page has been revised to include a better and broader set of categories since I first published it.

Continue reading ““Westerners can’t hack Vajrayana””

Are tantrikas in danger of extinction?

In my post Diclofenac warning for tantrikas I wrote:

Vultures are not afraid of death. They thrive on it. But they are in serious danger of extinction.

Dead vultures
Not many left

Sometimes I wonder if that is also true of tantrikas.

Continue reading “Are tantrikas in danger of extinction?”